Water Purification

The cholera disaster unfolding in Haiti is something that might have been prevented with the proper care and precautions.

This is not just a third world problem. In times of disaster, keep fresh potable water available.If you don’t have a cache of water set aside in pouches and larger containers, keep a good supply of water purification tablets available.

The illnesses associated with contaminated water are avoidable with the proper preparation and planning.

Use sturdy, BPA Free plastic containers when storing water for long periods-up to 5 years.

Supermarket water comes in plastic containers that can leech harmful chemicals into your drinking water.

Michael Skyler is the owner of the Earthquake Supply Center, an earthquake, disaster and emergency preparedness supply center. For information and supplies contact him at 415.459-5500  or visit http://www.earthquakesupplycenter.com

Summer Sale Special

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS MONTH

SUMMER SALE SPECIAL

15% OFF
On all Car and Home Emergency Survival Kits  through July 15, 2010

Summer is here and many of us are on the move, taking day trips, vacations and weekends away.

YOUR CAR IS THE MOST IMPORTANT PLACE TO KEEP SUPPLIES

What do you have in your vehicle to help you survive a disaster?
That may be all you will have to get you through an emergency if you are not home.

Now is the time to check the Emergency Preparedness Supplies in your vehicle to make sure your emergency water is fresh and your supplies are current.

DRIVE SAFELY AND BE PREPARED.

Use code: DPM15 when ordering by phone or when ordering online (put code DPM15 in notes section) and we will credit your card with your savings.

Happy driving.

Michael Skyler is the owner of the Earthquake Supply Center, an earthquake, disaster and emergency preparedness supply center. For information and supplies contact him at 415.459-5500  or visit http://www.earthquakesupplycenter.com

Time to change your emergency food and water?

WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU CHANGED OUT YOUR EMERGENCY FOOD AND WATER SUPPLIES? NOW IS THE PERFECT TIME!
When was the last time you checked your emergency supplies for expired items: food, water, lightsticks, batteries, medicines. emergency survival kits, etc
May 8th the National Association of Letter Carriers will host the largest annual food drive in the nation, Stamp Out Hunger.  This is a great opportunity to cycle out your old emergency food and water supplies and replace them.  Local Letter Carriers will pick up your non-perishable items at your mail box on May 8th and deliver them to food banks for distribution to needy families.  Last year, Letter Carriers collected over 73 million pounds of food!  So please take this opportunity to replenish your emergency food and water supplies.  The post office will also take your food donations if you would rather drop them off.  For more information on the program go to: http://www.nalc.org/commun/foodrive/

Michael Skyler is the owner of the Earthquake Supply Center, an earthquake, disaster and emergency preparedness supply center. For information and supplies contact him at 415.459-5500  or visit http://www.earthquakesupplycenter.com

Four “Under the Bed” Preparedness Items

These are the Mandatory Four “Under the Bed” Preparedness Items suggested if a major earthquake hits while you are in bed.

1. Pry bar – To open jammed doors or remove windows to escape.

2. Spare Shoes – Wrap a spare pair of shoe in a plastic bag. Broken glass and debris may be present on the bedroom floor or other floors as you search for others and check for the smell of gas indicating a gas leak.     Cut feet are the most common injury after an earthquake

3. Light – Keep a lightstick (or mine safe- non-sparking flashlight) available and use it as you check for gas leaks around your home. Do not use a regular flashlight which  could cause a spark and explosion until you are sure there is no gas leak.

4. Heavy Duty Work Gloves – To brush away glass and debris.

Michael Skyler is the owner of the Earthquake Supply Center, an earthquake, disaster and emergency preparedness supply center. For information and supplies contact him at 415.459-5500  or visit http://www.earthquakesupplycenter.com

Donations to Haiti

The Earthquake Supply Center in San Rafael, California, continues to support the local and global communities, most recently by donating much needed emergency supplies to the Haitian relief effort

We were contacted by a prominent East Bay orthopedic surgeon who was flying to Haiti Monday evening to help.

Foremost on the list of supplies requested and provided were water purification tablets, emergency food, blankets, headlights, lightsticks and first-aid supplies.

This disaster should be a wake-up call to everyone to be prepared at all times with an emergency survival kit in your cars and at home. Disasters can strike at anytime, anywhere.

Michael Skyler is the owner of the Earthquake Supply Center, an earthquake, disaster and emergency preparedness supply center. For information and supplies contact him at 415.459-5500  or visit http://www.earthquakesupplycenter.com

How Healthy Is Your Water Bottle? *

Should you be uneasy about that refillable water bottle you’ve been using? Maybe. Health-news headlines are yelping about bisphenol A (BPA), a suddenly scary component of plastic that’s hiding in plain sight in polycarbonate water bottles, water pitchers, baby bottles — even liners in canned foods. What’s so bad about BPA is that animal studies have linked it with cancer, miscarriage, fertility, obesity, immunity, and sexual-development problems. But that doesn’t mean you have to toss half the contents of your kitchen into a toxic-waste dump. Here’s our advice on staying safe. And sane.

How to Recognize the Real Thing
Bisphenol A is found in clear, hard, shatterproof plastics. Often, the letters PC (for polycarbonate) and/or the number 7 will be stamped in the little recycling triangle on or near the bottom of the container. But not every plastic stamped with a 7 contains BPA; your biggest clue is to look for hard, see-through, unbreakable things. Disposable soft drink and water bottles and liquid-medicine containers (like cough syrup bottles) are not polycarbonate and do not contain BPA. So while everyone is having a fit about disposable bottles for environmental reasons — and rightly so — it’s only the rigid refillable kind you need to worry about for health reasons. Make it easy by remembering the numbers: Only drink from those with numbers 4 and 2 in their triangles, or if need be, 5 and 1. In our opinion, you should avoid any with 3, 6, or 7 (not just for BPA reasons).

How Risky Is It, Really?
Not everyone agrees, even though low levels are estimated to be in the bodies of 9 out of 10 Americans. The FDA, the plastics industry, and the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis have all concluded that BPA levels are probably too low to be hazardous for adults. But some prominent BPA researchers say harmful effects begin at levels lower than those the government says are safe.

What has people really freaking out is that babies and kids may be at higher risk, according to the U.S. National Toxicology Program. BPA acts like a hormone in the body, and studies suggest that at the levels young children may be exposed to, there could be a danger of early puberty, hyperactivity, immune-system changes, and low sperm counts. Moms-to-be can protect their kids even before they’re born by not getting any mercury or composite dental fillings during pregnancy (use gold). Many experts believe these materials release high concentrations of mercury and BPA during application.

What You Can Do Right Now
Even if you can’t dodge exposure to this ubiquitous plastic the way you can dodge a playground ball, you can minimize your contact.

Don’t heat anything that might have BPA in it. BPA is in plastics because it makes them lightweight, shatterproof, extremely clear, and heat resistant. But when these plastics are warmed up, BPA leaches out of them 55 times faster than it does at room temperature. Rates stay high even after the contents cool. So:

· No microwaving in hard, clear, plastic containers — use ceramic or glass.
· No heating cans of baked beans (or cans of anything) on the grill.
· No pouring hot tea into your polycarbonate water bottle.
· No preparing baby formula with hot water directly in a polycarbonate baby bottle.

Replace your clear, hard, refillable plastic containers. Our recommendations:
· Serve hot foods and drinks in glass or ceramic containers.
· Get babies BPA-free plastic bottles (safer than glass).
· Get older kids and yourself BPA-free plastic water bottles — more and more are in stores. We also like the stainless steel and aluminum bottles that are now available.

For now, buy mainly fresh or frozen food. Currently, as many as 80% of cans contain BPA. Some brands are BPA-free, which is good news if you don’t have time to make black beans from scratch tonight. But if cans aren’t labeled BPA-free, think twice. This is particularly true for the two types of canned foods that leach the most BPAs from their liners:

· Fatty foods, such as coconut milk, salmon, creamy soups, and tuna packed in oil
· Acidic foods, such as tomato products and some juices.

Go fresh whenever possible. But that’s our advice in general.

* Source: Real Age Inc.

Michael Skyler is the owner of the Earthquake Supply Center, an earthquake, disaster and emergency preparedness supply center. For information and supplies contact him at 415.459-5500  or visit http://www.earthquakesupplycenter.com

Will you have enough light in an Emergency?

After an earthquake or other  catastrophic event,  most stores will be closed. Running water and electricity may be unavailable. Your home may be unsafe to occupy. You need to be self-sufficient. Be prepared to care for yourself and your family.

Will  you have enough  supplies to provide light to last for 7 days?

In addition to battery powered flashlights and lanterns consider solar powered and dynamo hand cranked flashlights, radio’s with lights and shake lights to provide a never ending supply of light

At the Earthquake Supply Center all of our  kits include emergency food, water, shelter, sanitation, first aid, lighting, and communication supplies necessary for surviving after a major disaster.

Please contact us for a free evaluation of your emergency preparedness survival needs.

Preparedness is an act of love.

The time to prepare for a major disaster is now.

Michael Skyler

Michael Skyler is the owner of the Earthquake Supply Center, an earthquake and emergency preparedness supply center. For information and supplies contact him at 415.459-5500  or visit http://www.earthquakesupplycenter.com

Food and Water-How much and what types

Earthquake Preparedness
How Much and What Types of Food and Water

Living in Earthquake Country requires a bit more attention to the possibilities of natural disasters than in other parts of the country.

Most people who take personal responsibility for their own and their family’s well being and get prepared usually get supplies and kits for their homes and cars.

How Much Food and Water?
If you’re someone who wants to be prepared for the major earthquake in our future, you’ve probably done something about having food and water available for you and your family. Here are a few things to keep in mind:
1. Some disaster preparedness groups recommend having 3 days worth of food and water (1 gallon per person per day). I agree with the ones that say be ready for at least a full week, 7 days (think Katrina).

2.Except for the “Get Ready” kit offered by The Earthquake Supply Center in San Rafael, which is a 2 person, 7 day kit, I’ve never seen an emergency kit that has enough water. You really need to supplement the kits with extra water.

3. The best plan for storing water is to use a food grade water storage container, sizes range from 2.5 gallons to 55 gallon water barrels with either a siphon or spigot, which you treat with 5 year water preserver so it will remain stable and last for up to 5 years.
Many people mistakenly believe that adding bleach to their stored water will keep it stable for 5 years. This is not true, in an emergency it will help purify your water for the short term so you can drink it but it will not stabilize water for long term storage. Remember bleach is not designed or approved for human consumption.
.
Another thing to consider is that the plastic used for water containers that is sold in supermarkets and other stores are not designed for long term storage and will start to leach into your water within the first six months.
You should replace your stored water every 6-7 months to avoid both leaching from plastic containers as well as bacterial build up.

4. Have plenty of long term foods on hand like 5 year food bars, MRE’s (5-10 year shelf life) and other similar foods with a 5+ year shelf life.
Most canned foods have a 12-24 month shelf life and need to be replaced often in addition they are heavy and not ideal if you have to move your supplies. Also most canned foods contain a high level of sodium and are thirst provoking, requiring a larger supply of available water. Go with the lightweight 5 year foods.
Starting off with food and water that have a 5 year shelf life is a lot easier than replacing these items every 6-12 months. However good our intentions are to replace these items once or twice a year.

Fortunately in Marin county people are able to take advantage of the GET READY MARIN training, provided by the local Fire Departments and volunteer Disaster Councils that help people understand what to do and how to prepare for earthquakes and other emergencies/disasters.

Supplies should be arranged, stored and located where personnel will be able to access the materials quickly and easily after a disaster strikes. Preferably in your car or in a shed outdoors. Supplies should be stored in backpacks, duffel bags and other containers with a high degree of mobility in case you have to move to another location.

The Earthquake Supply Center in San Rafael offers a large selection of Emergency Survival kits for your car and home, including the 7 day “GET READY MARIN” KIT.

Give a gift of Emergency Preparedness for the holidays.
People you care about and loved ones will appreciate the gift more, knowing it is something they truly need and can use.

While most people think about the importance getting prepared, the majority know it’s a good idea and something that they should do but they don’t.
For some people it is an overwhelming task to assemble all the supplies they need and so they do little or nothing.
The Earthquake Supply Center is a one stop shop for getting prepared with all the supplies you need in one location. The people there are knowledgeable and able to advise you on a wide variety of subjects and preparedness needs. Check out their website at http://www.earthquakesupplycenter.com

Preparedness is an act of love.

The time to prepare for a major disaster is now.

Michael Skyler

Michael Skyler is the owner of the Earthquake Supply Center, an earthquake and emergency preparedness supply center. For information and supplies contact him at 415.459-5500  or visit http://www.earthquakesupplycenter.com

Plan for Evacuation

- There is no time like the present when it comes to sitting down with your family and preparing for the day when you may be forced to evacuate your home.

In the event of a sudden emergency or disaster, you may have just minutes to gather your family and important papers and get out of your house, possibly for good. With preparation and practice, you stand the best chance of getting out with what you and your family need and ending up in a safe place.

Here are five steps to help you and your family on the road to safety:

1. Arrange Your Evacuation Ahead of Time

  • Identify where you can go in the event of an evacuation. Try to have more than one option: the home of a friend or family member in another town, a hotel or a shelter. Keep the phone numbers and addresses of these locations handy.
  • Map out your primary route and a backup route in case roads are blocked or impassable. Make sure you have a map of the area available.
  • In case your family members are separated before or during the evacuation, identify a specific place to meet and ask an out-of-town friend or family member to act as a contact person.
  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or local radio or TV stations for evacuation instructions. If advised to evacuate, do so immediately.

2. Create a Home Inventory

Create a complete home inventory of your personal property. A home inventory will help you ensure that you have purchased enough insurance to replace your possessions. It will also speed the claims process and substantiate losses for income tax purposes.

To make creating a home inventory easier, the I.I.I. provides free, downloadable software located at KnowYourStuff.org . The Know Your Stuff software allows you to add digital photographs of your valuables and save scanned receipts. It can help you organize and list your possessions on your computer, after which you can burn the finished inventory onto a CD-ROM or use the optional secure online storage service, Vault24, accessible from the software itself. Print out and store a hard copy of your home inventory, making sure to keep a copy with your important documents and a second copy in a safe place outside your home (in a safe-deposit box, with an online storage service or with an out-of-town friend or family member).

3. Plan What to Take

  • Earthquake/Emergency Preparedness KitEmergency Preparedness Kit
  • Bottled water
  • Clothing and bedding (sleeping bags, pillows)
  • Flashlight, battery-powered radio and extra batteries
  • Special items for infants or elderly or disabled family members
  • Cash, Glasses, Contact info
  • Medicines, prescriptions and first aid kit
  • Pet food and other items for pets (litter boxes, leashes)

4. Gather Important Documents

Keep important documents in a safe place that you can access easily.

  • Home inventory

5. Take the Ten-Minute Challenge

To find out if you are ready, do a real-time test. Give yourself just 10 minutes to get your family and belongings into the car and on the road to safety. By planning ahead and practicing, you should be able to gather your family members and pets, along with the most important items they will need, calmly and efficiently, with a minimum of stress and confusion.
Michael Skyler is the owner of the Earthquake Supply Center, an earthquake and emergency preparedness supply center. For information and supplies contact him at 415.459-5500  or visit http://www.earthquakesupplycenter.com

Keep a survival kit with you in your car at all times!

What to do before an Earthquake. part 6 of 6

Earthquakes strike suddenly, violently and without warning. Identifying potential hazards ahead of time and advance planning can reduce the dangers of serious injury or loss of life from an earthquake. Repairing deep plaster cracks in ceilings and foundations, anchoring overhead lighting fixtures to the ceiling, and following local seismic building standards, will help reduce the impact of earthquakes.

  1. Help Your Community Get Ready
    • Publish a special section in your local newspaper with emergency information on earthquakes. Localize the information by printing the phone numbers of local emergency services offices, the American Red Cross, and hospitals.
    • Conduct a week-long series on locating hazards in the home.
    • Work with local emergency services and American Red Cross officials to prepare special reports for people with mobility impairments on what to do during an earthquake.
    • Provide tips on conducting earthquake drills in the home.
    • Interview representatives of the gas, electric, and water companies about shutting off utilities.
    • Work together in your community to apply your knowledge to building codes, retrofitting programs, hazard hunts, and neighborhood and family emergency plans.
  2. Michael Skyler is the owner of the Earthquake Supply Center, an earthquake and emergency preparedness supply center. For information and supplies contact him at 415.459-5500  or visit http://www.earthquakesupplycenter.com
  3. Keep a survival kit with you in your car at all times!